Graphics Device Interface

graphics device interface

Graphics Device Interface, also known as GDI, is a Microsoft Windows application programming interface. This is a crucial Windows component since it’s in charge of representing graphical elements on monitors and printers.

The Graphics Device Interface was a component in the first version of Windows and it remained a component ever since. The API is designed to be used by C or C++ programmers and it can be used in all Windows-based applications.

Graphics Device Interface: Here’s all you need to know

How does Graphics Device Interface work?

GDI is an API, and whenever an application needs to display an object, it makes a call to the GDI function along with the required parameters. The GDI then creates an object by sending the commands to the screen and renders the image.


Frequently asked questions about Graphics Device Interface

What are the benefits of GDI?

One of the benefits of Graphics Device Interface are its scaling capabilities and abstract representation of target devices. GDI allows you to draw on multiple devices and get the proper results in each case.


What is a GDI printer?

GDI printer Graphics Device Interface

GDI printer has built-in support for Graphical Device Interface, so it doesn’t require conversion to PostScript, PCL or other formats when printing. Basically, these types of printers rely on the host computer to rasterize the pages.


What are the GDI primitives?

The GDI primitives are the types of graphics you display on-screen or the printer. The GDI primitives include lines and curves, filled areas, bitmaps, and text.


What is GDI C#?

GDI+ is a portion of the operating system that renders two-dimensional graphics. This includes vector graphics, imaging, and typography. The GDI+ class interface is a part of the .NET Framework, and it’s used for building and deploying XML Web services and other applications. GDI+ also improves on GDI and adds new features.