Surface devices to support wireless charging of stylus pens

Don Sharpe
by Don Sharpe
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  • Microsoft is developing a magnetic-induction-based charging system for Surface Pen.
  • The wireless charging system is ideal for incorporating into super-slim Surface devices.
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Stylus pen and a tab

There are different ways to charge a Surface Pen, but none of them utilizes electromagnetic induction within the PC’s casing. That is set to change according to a patent that the folks at WindowsUnited spotted recently.

The patented tech is the kind of wireless charging you may want to keep an eye out for if you use super slim Surface tablets.

The challenge of wirelessly charging thin tablets

According to the patent, Microsoft is looking for a way to conveniently charge Surface Pens within the housing of thinner PCs. But traditional wireless charging systems are too big for devices that keep getting smaller. Instead, they are appropriate for charging stylus pens outside of the PC’s body.

So, Microsoft has patented an alternative solution that utilizes magnetic induction to charge Surface Pens. The proposed system will let you charge your stylus pen within the body of a super slim Surface PC.

The current flowing through the wireless charging coil induces a surface current in the metal casing surrounding the electronic device. The current flowing through the wireless charging coil and the surface current cause a combined magnetic field.

What Surface device will have the patented technology?

There are several Surface devices that people expect Microsoft to launch this year, and one of them is Surface Pro 8. Also, there has been a Surface Pro release almost yearly since its introduction. Each new model has always had superior features.

So, it makes sense to anticipate that this device may come with the patented wireless charging system.

You could also look at Microsoft’s upcoming dual-screen devices as potential candidates for such a solution. For example, the Surface Duo seems ideal for the tech because it supports Surface Pen, according to some versions of its emulator. The device should be out toward the end of this year.

However, maybe folks are reading too much into a patent that Microsoft has no plans of implementing in the foreseeable future.