How to disable Open File security warning on Windows 10

Milan Stanojevic avatar. By: Milan Stanojevic
12 minute read

Home » How to disable Open File security warning on Windows 10

Your online security is rather important, and Windows 10 comes with certain features that will protect you from malicious files. However, sometimes security dialogues can be a bit annoying, and in this article we’ll show you how to disable Open File security warning on Windows 10.

How to disable Open File security warning on Windows 10?

Solution 1 – Change your Internet options

Open File security warning usually appears when trying to run downloaded files, but you can fix this problem simply by changing your Internet options. This is relatively simple and you can do it by following these steps:

  1. Press Windows Key + S and enter internet options. Select Internet Options from the list of results.
  2. When Internet Properties window opens, go to Security tab and click on Custom Level button.
  3. List of settings will appear. Locate Launching applications and unsafe files and select Enable. Now click OK to save changes.

After changing these settings you should be able to run downloaded files without any problems.

Solution 2 – Disable User Account Control

If you’re frequently getting Open File security warning, you might be able to disable it by turning off User Account Control. This is a security feature of Windows that notifies you when trying to change a setting or perform an action that requires administrative privileges. Users claim that this feature is the cause behind this security warning, and if you want to disable it, you need to turn off User Account Control. To do that, follow these steps:

  1. Press Windows Key + S and enter user. Select Change User Account Control settings from the menu.
  2. When User Account Control Settings window appears, move the slider all the way down to Never notify. Click on OK to save changes.

Once you disable User Account Control, you should see less security warnings on your PC. Disabling User Account Control won’t greatly reduce your security, so you can disable it without fear.

Solution 3 – Modify your registry

Your registry holds sensitive system information, and by modifying it you can disable this security warning from appearing. Modifying the registry can be potentially dangerous if you’re not careful, so we advise you to be extra cautious. To fix this problem, do the following:

  1. Press Windows Key + R and enter regedit. Press Enter or click OK.
  2. When Registry Editor opens, go to File > Export.
    Select All as Export range, enter the desired File name, choose a safe location and click on Save.
    In case anything goes wrong after modifying your registry, you can easily restore it by running the exported file.
  3. Navigate to HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies key in the left pane. Now navigate to the Associations key. If this key isn’t available, you’ll need to create it. To do that, simply right click the Policies key and choose New > Key from the menu.
    Now enter Associations as the name of the key and navigate to it.
  4. Once you navigate to Associations key, look for LowRiskFileTypes in the right pane. If this value isn’t available, you’ll need to create it manually. To do that, right click the empty space in the right pane and choose New > String Value from the menu.
    Enter LowRiskFileTypes as the name of the string. Double click the LowRiskFileTypes to open its properties.
  5. When the Properties window opens, paste the following into the Value data field:
    .avi;.bat;.cmd;.exe;.htm;.html;.lnk;.mpg;.mpeg;.mov;.mp3;.mp4;.mkv;.msi;.m3u;.rar;.reg;.txt;.vbs;.wav;.zip;.7z
    If needed, you can add more extensions in order to disable the security warning for them. After you’re done, click on OK.
  6. After making the changes, close Registry Editor and restart your PC.

Once your PC restarts, the problem should be fixed and you won’t see the security warning any more.

If you don’t want to manually edit your registry, you can download Disable_Open-File_Security_Warning.reg file and run it. By doing that, you’ll disable the security warning for the specified file types. In case you want to enable the security warning, simply download Enable_Open-File_Security_Warning.reg and run it.

Solution 4 – Edit your Group Policy

You can prevent this security warning from appearing by using Group Policy Editor. This is a useful application that allows you to change various settings, but unfortunately it’s available only on Pro and Enterprise versions of Windows. To use Group Policy, do the following:

  1. Press Windows Key + R and enter gpedit.msc. Press Enter or click OK.
  2. In the left pane navigate to User Configuration > Administrative Templates > Windows Components > Attachment Manager. In the right pane locate Do not preserve zone information in file attachments.
  3. Select Enabled and click on Apply and OK to save changes.
  4. Now click on Inclusion list for low file types.
  5. Select Enabled and paste the following line in Specify low risk extensions input field:
    .avi;.bat;.cmd;.exe;.htm;.html;.lnk;.mpg;.mpeg;.mov;.mp3;.mp4;.mkv;.msi;.m3u;.rar;.reg;.txt;.vbs;.wav;.zip;.7z

    Now click on Apply and OK to save changes.

Close Group Policy Editor and restart your PC. Once your PC restarts, check if the problem still appears.

Solution 5 – Use Command Prompt

You can also prevent this security message from appearing by using Command Prompt. Many users don’t know this, but you can use Command Prompt to quickly edit your registry. We have to warn you that modifying the registry can be potentially dangerous, so you’re doing it at your own risk. To fix this problem using Command Prompt, do the following:

  1. Press Windows Key + X and choose Command Prompt (Admin) from the menu. If Command Prompt isn’t available, you can use PowerShell (Admin) instead.
  2. When Command Prompt starts, enter the following lines:
    • REG ADD “HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Internet Settings\Zones\3” /V “1806” /T “REG_DWORD” /D “00000000” /F
    • REG ADD “HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Internet Settings\Zones\3” /V “1806” /T “REG_DWORD” /D “00000000” /F
    • REG ADD “HKLM\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\Security” /V “DisableSecuritySettingsCheck” /T “REG_DWORD” /D “00000001” /F

After all commands are executed, you might have to restart your PC to apply the changes.

Solution 6 – Use the bat file to disable Zone File Checking

According to users, you might be able to prevent Open File security warning from appearing simply by running a single file. To do that, download Disable_Zone_Checking_for_Current_User.bat and run it.

After running this file, the security warning should be disabled completely for your account. If you want to enable the security warning, you need to download Enable_Zone_Checking_for_Current_User.bat and run it.

This is one of the simplest ways to disable this security warning because it requires almost no user interaction, so feel free to try it.

Solution 6 – Unblock the file

To stop this security warning from appearing, you might need to unblock your file. Sometimes files can become blocked causing this warning to appear. To unblock your file, be sure that the file is located in a directory that is associated with your user account such as your Desktop or Documents. If you want to unblock a specific file, you need to do the following:

  1. Right click the problematic file and choose Properties from the menu.
  2. When Properties window opens, go to General tab and click on Unblock button.

After doing that, you won’t see the security warning for this file any more.

Solution 7 – Uncheck Always ask before opening this file option

If you want to disable Open File security warning for a specific file, you can do it simply by unchecking a single option. To do that, follow these steps:

  1. Run the problematic file.
  2. You should see an Open File security warning. Uncheck Always ask before opening this file option. Now click on Run to continue.

After doing that, you should be able to open that file without any security warnings. This method is simple and straightforward, and it’s rather useful if you want to disable this security warning for a specific file.

Solution 8 – Take ownership over the problematic file

If you’re getting this security warning on your PC, you might be able to disable it for a specific file by taking ownership over that file. This is relatively simple, and you can do it by following these steps:

  1. Locate the file that is giving you this security warning and right click it. Choose Properties from the menu.
  2. When Properties window opens, go to Security tab and click on Advanced.
  3. In the Owner section click on Change.
  4. Select User or Group window will appear. In the Enter the object name to select field enter your user name. Now click on Check Names. If everything is in order, click on OK to save changes.
  5. The owner of the file should now be changed. Now you just have to click on Apply and OK to save changes.

After taking the ownership over the file, you should be able to run it without any security warnings. If you’re an advanced user, you can also use Command Prompt to take ownership over a certain file. To do that, just follow these steps:

  1. Start Command Prompt or PowerShell as administrator.
  2. When Command Prompt opens, enter:
    • takeown /F <path_to_file>

Of course, be sure to replace the <path_to_file> with an actual path to the problematic file. This method is faster, but it requires you to enter the exact path to the problematic application. If you’re an advanced user and familiar with Command Prompt, feel free to try this method instead.

Solution 9 – Change Local intranet settings

According to users, this security warning can appear if you’re trying to run an application from a network directory. To fix this problem, you need to add the name or the IP address of the server on which the application is stored to Intranet settings. This is relatively simple to do, and you can do it by following these steps:

  1. Open Internet Options. We showed you how to do that in Solution 1, so be sure to check it for detailed instructions.
  2. When Internet Properties window opens, go to Security tab and select Local intranet. Now click on Sites button.
  3. Local intranet window will now appear. Click on Advanced button.
  4. Now enter the address of the server in the Add this website to the zone field. You can use the server’s domain or you can use its IP address. Just be sure to enter \ before the server’s address or domain. Now click on Add button. After you’re done adding servers, click the Close button.
  5. Save changes and your problem should be resolved completely.

If you don’t want to use Internet Options, you can make the same changes using the Group Policy Editor. To do that, follow these steps:

  1. Open Group Policy Editor. To see how to do that, check the first step of Solution 4.
  2. When Group Policy Editor starts, navigate to Computer Configuration > Administrative Templates > Windows Components > Internet Explorer > Internet Control Panel > Security Page in the left pane. In the right pane, locate and double click Site to Zone Assignment List.
  3. Now select Enabled and click on Show button.
  4. In the Value name column enter the IP address or domain name of the server. As for Value, enter 1. After you enter all the necessary addresses, click on OK to save changes.
  5. Now just click on Apply and OK to apply changes.

Both methods will achieve the same results, so you can use any of them. Keep in mind that this solution works only if you’re trying to run an application from a network directory.

Solution 10 – Use Command Prompt

If you’re frequently getting this security warning, you might be able to disable it for a specific file by using Command Prompt. To do that you need to follow these steps:

  1. Start Command Prompt as administrator.
  2. Use Command Prompt to navigate to the location of the problematic file.
  3. Now enter the following commands:
    • move your_file_name.exe NewName
    • type NewName > your_file_name.exe

This is a solid workaround, and it works according to users, so feel free to try it out. Keep in mind that in order to use this solution you need to have a basic understanding of Command Prompt syntax.

Solution 11 – Check Include all network paths options

Few users claim that you can fix this problem simply by checking few settings in Internet Options. To do that, follow these steps:

  1. Open Internet Options. Navigate to Security tab, select Local intranet and click on Sites button.
  2. Local intranet window will appear. Uncheck all options except Include all network paths (UNCs). After doing that, click on OK to save changes.
  3. Optional: Few users suggest that you should check Include all local (intranet) sites not listed in other zones option as well, so you might want to do that.

After doing that, the problem should be fixed and you’ll be able to run files from network directories without any problems.

Solution 12 – Create a bat file that will run the problematic file

According to users, you can avoid this security warning while running a certain application simply by creating a bat file that will start the application for you. To do that, follow these steps:

  1. Open Notepad.
  2. Now paste the following code:
    • start “c:\windows\system32” notepad.exe

    We used Notepad as an example, but if you want to launch any other application using the bat file, you need to enter the location of the file between the quotes and the file name after it.

  3. Now you just have to save your file. To do that, go to File > Save as.
  4. Set Save as type to All Files and enter script.bat as the file name. Now choose the save directory and click the Save button.
  5. Now you just have to locate script.bat file that you created and run it and the application will start without any security warnings.

This is a solid workaround, but it might be a bit complicated since you have to create a bat script for that specific file. Since this is just a workaround, you’ll have to use the script to start the desired application every time.

Solution 13 – Use icals command

Several reported this security warning while trying to run applications from Start Menu or from their Taskbar. According to them, you can fix this problem simply by using the icals command. This is relatively simple and you can do it by following these steps:

  1. Open Command Prompt as administrator.
  2. When Command Prompt starts, run the following commands one by one:
    • ICACLS “%programdata%\Microsoft\Windows\Start Menu\Programs” /Setintegritylevel (OI)(CI)Medium
    • ICACLS “%userprofile%\Favorites\Links” /Setintegritylevel (OI)(CI)Medium
    • ICACLS “%userprofile%\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\Quick Launch” /Setintegritylevel (OI)(CI)Medium
    • ICACLS “%userprofile%\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\Quick Launch\User pinned\Taskbar” /Setintegritylevel (OI)(CI)Medium

After running these commands the security warning should disappear and you won’t see it while trying to run applications from Taskbar or Start Menu.

If you’re having this problem with Desktop shortcuts, you might be able to fix it by running Command Prompt and using ICACLS “C:\Users\<username goes here>\Desktop” /Setintegritylevel (OI)(CI)M command. After doing that, you should be able to run shortcuts from your Desktop without problems.

Solution 14 – Download and use streams utility

If you’re getting Open File security warning while opening a specific file, you might be able to fix it by using streams tools. This tool is a part of Sysinternals and you can download it for free from Microsoft’s website. After you download the tool, you need to start it manually or use Command Prompt to navigate to its directory and enter the following command:

  • streams.exe -accepteula -d <path_to_the_file>\application_name.exe

After running this command you’ll remove all zone data from that file and you won’t see any security warnings while running it.

Solution 15 – Copy the files to a different location

According to users, you might be able to fix the problem with the annoying security warning simply by copying the affected files to a new location. To do that, locate the problematic files and select them. Now copy them to your Desktop.

After doing that, delete the original files from their directory. Now move the files from your Desktop to the original location. After doing that you should be able to run those files without any problems. Users reported that this workaround works with Internet Explorer favorites, but be sure to try it with other files that are giving you this security warning.

Open File security warning can be rather annoying at times, but you should be able to prevent it from appearing by using one of our solutions.

READ ALSO:

Discussions

Next up

People bar to be dropped in upcoming Windows 10 version

Giles Ensor avatar. By: Giles Ensor
2 minute read

Reports are being circulated that Microsoft intends to drop the People bar feature in the Windows 10 19H1 update. The original report came from a […]

Continue Reading

Warning! Nasty new Office 365 phishing attack doing the rounds

Giles Ensor avatar. By: Giles Ensor
2 minute read

A new and very nasty phishing attack has been doing the rounds, and it is extremely difficult to spot. Here is what you need to […]

Continue Reading

6 best personal cloud storage solutions for your files and folders

Daniel Segun By: Daniel Segun
Less than a 1 minute read

Are you looking for the best personal cloud storage application for your Windows 10 PC? Windows Report has got you covered! File storage has come […]

Continue Reading