Run this Powershell script to remove default apps from Windows 10 Image

By: Madeleine Dean
2 minute read
powershell remove bloatware

Windows 10 comes with a series of default apps that cannot be deleted. Some of these apps include the Xbox app, OneNote, the apps for Mail, Music, Movies and TV and Calendar, Groove Music, etc.

The problem is that not all users need these apps and they end up occupying space. Having the option to quickly delete them would make many users happy.

Unfortunately, when you install the next major OS version on your computer, these unwanted apps and programs return alongside other bloatware.

The good news that you can avoid bloatware by downloading the Windows 10 Bloatware-free edition. If you prefer tweaking your PC, you can also use dedicated PowerShell scripts to delete the unwanted apps.

Remove Windows 10 bloatware with this PowerShell script

One resourceful Reddit user recently published an interesting script that allows Fall Creators Update users to quickly and easily remove default apps.

First, run Powershell in administrator mode, and then launch the command Set-ExecutionPolicy RemoteSigned to run your own scripts.
Save your script with a .ps1 extension, and then simply execute it.

Here are the instructions to save:

$AppsList = ‘Microsoft.3DBuilder’,
‘Microsoft.BingFinance’,
‘Microsoft.BingNews’,
‘Microsoft.BingSports’,
‘Microsoft.MicrosoftSolitaireCollection’,
‘Microsoft.People’,
‘Microsoft.Windows.Photos’,
‘Microsoft.WindowsCamera’,
‘microsoft.windowscommunicationsapps’,
‘Microsoft.WindowsPhone’,
‘Microsoft.WindowsSoundRecorder’,
‘Microsoft.XboxApp’,
‘Microsoft.ZuneMusic’,
‘Microsoft.ZuneVideo’,
‘Microsoft.Getstarted’,
‘Microsoft.WindowsFeedbackHub’,
‘Microsoft.XboxIdentityProvider’,
‘Microsoft.MicrosoftOfficeHub’

ForEach ($App in $AppsList){
$PackageFullName = (Get-AppxPackage $App).PackageFullName
$ProPackageFullName = (Get-AppxProvisionedPackage -online | where {$_.Displayname -eq $App}).PackageName
write-host $PackageFullName
Write-Host $ProPackageFullName
if ($PackageFullName){
Write-Host “Removing Package: $App”
remove-AppxPackage -package $PackageFullName
}
else{
Write-Host “Unable to find package: $App”
}
if ($ProPackageFullName){
Write-Host “Removing Provisioned Package: $ProPackageFullName”
Remove-AppxProvisionedPackage -online -packagename $ProPackageFullName
}
else{
Write-Host “Unable to find provisioned package: $App”
}
}

You can also use another dedicated PowerShell script available on GitHub. Windows10Debloater removes bloatware and disables Cortana without breaking the search function.

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