How to Activate Windows 10 if you Replace your Motherboard

Milan Stanojevic avatar. By: Milan Stanojevic
3 minute read

Home » Windows » How to Activate Windows 10 if you Replace your Motherboard

Microsoft has changed the way users activate Windows, and now users have one major concern and that is whether Windows 10 will activate if you replace your motherboard. Many users are concerned about this, so let’s see if how to activate Windows 10 if you replace your motherboard.

As we said, the way you activate Windows 10 has been changed, and now before starting Windows 10 checks your hardware. If Windows 10 notices any major hardware changes, such as motherboard replacement it will stop working. This has some disadvantages especially if you need to replace your motherboard due to damage or if you simply want to upgrade it.

Will Windows 10 Work If I Replace My Motherboard?

Windows 10 activation is closely tied to your hardware configuration and major hardware change, such as motherboard replacement, will deactivate your Windows 10. So what can you do in these situations?

Solution 1 – Install Windows 7 or Windows 8 again and upgrade to Windows 10

This is a tedious solution, but it has been confirmed as working. You’ll have to install the previous genuine version of Windows and upgrade it to Windows 10 in order to activate it again. Remember, when you activate Windows 10 again it will be tied to your motherboard, so any motherboard replacement will require that you install previous version of Windows and upgrade to Windows 10 again in order to activate it.

Solution 2 – Purchase the Windows 10 license key

This is much quicker solution and if you have replaced your motherboard you can just buy Windows 10 license key, install Windows 10 and activate it using the license key.

Although many users might not be pleased with this solution, it might become the only solution after the free upgrade period expires on July 29, 2016.

Solution 3 – Contact the Microsoft support

If you have recently replaced your motherboard, you might want to contact Microsoft and ask them if they could activate your copy of Windows 10 for you. Or better yet, if you’re planning to change your motherboard it wouldn’t hurt to contact Microsoft and ask them if they could activate your copy of Windows 10 after the upgrade.

Solution 4 – Install Windows 7 or 8 on new hard drive and upgrade to Windows 10

This solution is similar to Solution 1, but with a little trick. We have to notice that we’re not certain that this solution will work, but some users have confirmed that it works for them.

We also have to mention that this solution will require you to use a blank hard drive, or any old hard drive that you don’t use anymore. In addition, you’ll have to remove your current hard drive, so make sure that your computer isn’t under warranty or else you’ll break your warranty.

  1. Remove your current hard drive from your computer and replace it with another hard drive.
  2. Install Windows 7 or Windows 8 on the new hard drive. Then upgrade it to Windows 10.
  3. After the upgrade is complete make sure that you activate Windows 10.
  4. When you activate Windows 10 remove the current hard drive and replace it with previous one that has all your files on it.
  5. After doing that Windows 10 should work normally and you’ll have access to all your files and applications.

Discussions

Next up

Apex Legends crashes with no error message? Fix it now

Matthew Adams By: Matthew Adams
4 minute read

Apex Legends is the latest battle royale blockbuster for Windows that EA and Respawn released on Origin. However, some Apex players have stated that the […]

Continue Reading

Fix: “Your PC is Offline” error in Windows 10, 8.1

Andrew Wafer By: Andrew Wafer
5 minute read

Do you like to keep your Windows 8 / Windows 8.1 system secured? Of course, you do, as everyone tries to keep their data in […]

Continue Reading

Here’s how to permanently fix Taskhost.exe high CPU usage

John Waibochi avatar. By: John Waibochi
5 minute read

Taskhost.exe is a process that hosts various Windows processes running from a dynamic link library instead of the conventional .exes (executable files). You see, libraries (.dlls) […]

Continue Reading