How to enable Windows Projected File System on Windows 10

Madeleine Dean By: Madeleine Dean
2 minute read

Home » News » How to enable Windows Projected File System on Windows 10

Microsoft recently rolled out a new Windows 10 build to Fast Ring Insiders. So, if you already got bored with the previous build, you can now install build 17604.

This new release adds a very interesting feature to the table, namely the Windows Projected File System.

Insiders can already enable this feature by going to Windows Features > Turn Windows features on and off. All you need to do is check the Windows Projected File System box and that’s it.

Windows Projected File System

Tero Alhonen also noticed this change and shared the screenshot above with the whole world on Twitter.

On the other hand, Walking Cat suggests that Microsoft renamed the GVFS (Git Virtual File System) to ProjF (Windows Projected Filesystem).

Anyway, we’ll dig more into this and update the article as soon as new information is available.

So, if you installed the latest Windows 10 build on your computer and tested the Windows Projected File System feature, tell us more about your experience in the comments below.

UPDATE:

As one of our readers explained, instead of having developers install GVFS, the Redmond giant is now including it as a feature of Windows. This corroborates Walking Cat’s hypothesis.

For more information, you can check out our reader’s comment below. Thank you, Josedolf.

Windows Projected File System is not security-related as Windows Security is focusing on Virtualization-Based Security. Windows Projected Filesystem is likely similar to what they did with OneDrive: the files are on a remote server, and you can see “placeholders”, but they’re not actually on your machine unless you open them (thus a “projected” file system).
UPDATE
: Just checked some Windows Insider and other developers’ Twitter accounts, and Windows Projected File System is what powers GVFS, allowing for very large repositories with little performance impact. It is marked “Beta” because there is no documentation yet.

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Editor’s Note: This post was originally published in February 2018 and has been since updated for freshness, and accuracy.

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