5 best metronomes for piano to buy [2021 Guide]

Madalina Dinita
by Madalina Dinita
Former Managing Editor
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Metronome for piano

Metronomes have been with us for a very long time, and they are here to help musicians learn how to keep the beat. They are used with pretty much any instrument, so their use is quite large.

When it comes to playing the piano, you may want to go for a metronome that also looks in a certain way, such as the elegant mechanical ones with a wooden finish.

For the piano players out there, we’ve compiled a list of what we think are the best metronomes to use when playing the piano.

Note: Deals are subject to change. Keep in mind that the price tag often varies. We recommend going on the vendor’s website to check the price. Some products may be out of stock by the time you’ve made your purchasing decision. So, hurry up and hit the buy button.

What are the best metronomes for piano that I can buy?

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Veteto Mechanical Metronome

  • Produce rhythms at a proper pace when practicing piano, violin, guitar, bass, drum and other musical instruments
  • Audible click & bell ring to maintain the rhythm while reading music sheet
  • Wind up mechanism produce metrical beats
  • No battery required
  • A bit too loud

The Veteto mechanical metronome is easy to use even for children and beginners. You only have to take out the brake, pull off the cover, adjust the beat and tempo, and then you are ready to use it.

This mechanical metronome helps you develop rhythm, to maintain tempo, or to play accurately. An average single full wind (2160 clicks) lasts at least 18 minutes depending on the tempo.


Tempi Metronome

  • Establishes accurate musical timing, helps play at a proper pace, provides a firm sense of rhythm
  • No batteries
  • Average 20-minute wind for longer practice and less frustration
  • 40-208bpm for choosing any tempo
  • Quality control issues

Metronomes are simple devices by design, so they are pretty much all alike, besides the exterior design and the quality of the build.

For example, the Tempi Metronome manages to teach you how to hold a tempo fast and easily, and the exterior design makes it blend in perfectly with your piano and vintage furniture.


Creatov Mechanical Metronome

  • Classical pyramid design
  • Requires no batteries
  • The pendulum can make up 40 to 208 beats per minute
  • The beat selection is 0, 2, 3, 4, 6
  • Quality control issues

If beauty is what you value most in the world, then a device like a Creatov Mechanical Metronome will definitely satisfy your craving for all things elegant.

Not only does it have the same classic pyramid design, but the black finish and metallic parts make it look like something out of the 17th century.


Donner Mechanical Metronome

  • Classical pyramid design
  • Requires no batteries
  • The pendulum can make up 40 to 208 beats per minuteApplicable for practicing piano, violin, guitar, bass, drum and other musical instruments.
  • Plastic materials make it feel cheap

The Donner Mechanical Metronome is a bit more versatile when it comes to the looks since you have a black, brown and redwood variant.

Other than that it has the same features as a regular metronome, with adjustable tempo and a long wind-up time, and the price is affordable as well.


NEUMA Mechanical Metronome

  • The speed of the pendulum is 40-208 times per minute
  • The stress bell is chosen as 0.2.3.4.6
  • Applicable for practicing piano, violin, guitar, bass, drum and other musical instruments
  • No battery and other power supply
  • Quality control issues

The NEUMA Mechanical Metronome stands out among our other entries thanks to its more futuristic and minimalist design.

It still has the classic pyramid shape, but the angles and shapes that go into it make it look like the 17th and 21st century met when it was created.


Just because a metronome is something used to learn how to play music, it doesn’t mean that it shouldn’t look great as well.

While there are electronic metronomes out there, nothing can compare to the classic design of a mechanical pyramid metronome that just looks so well with an acoustic piano or some solid vintage furniture.

FAQ: Learn more about the metronomes

  • What is the best metronome to buy?

There are several good metronome brands on the market, so take a look at our best metronomes for piano deals for more information.

  • What is the best metronome for drummers?

A good metronome is what a drummer needs in order to keep the beats in time. But if you experience also other instruments, you may want to check out our best metronomes for clarinet and trumpet deals.

  • What is a metronome used for?

A metronome is a tool that help keep steady time when playing music. Check out our best metronomes for live performances deals.

Editor's Note: This article was originally published in November 2019 and was revamped and updated in November 2020 for freshness, accuracy, and comprehensiveness.