Windows 10 Anniversary Update deleting Linux partitions?

Radu Tyrsina
by Radu Tyrsina
Founder & Editor-in-Chief
9 Comments
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Many folks who are running Windows 10 on their computers, usually have a Linux partition installed as well. Regular folks do it, developers do it, and then the few who prefer to use Linux but are forced to use Windows. But here’s the thing, it would appear as if the Windows 10 Anniversary Update is removing Linux partition.

Alan Pope, Ubuntu Community manager at Canonical, took to Twitter recently to complain that he has seen several reports of folks claiming the Windows 10 Anniversary Update has been deleting partitions containing Linux operating systems.

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This should not be taken as any confirmation that Microsoft’s operating system is indeed working against Linux partitions after the Anniversary Update. However, we do believe Linux users should hold off a while from upgrading Windows 10 until more information is released. Furthermore, we also recommend backing up your Linux install, you know, just to be on the safe side of things.

There is no reason for Alan Pope to make up such a story, so chances are, something is going on. If true, then this might be a bug within the Anniversary Update, something Microsoft has missed.

Personally, I haven’t installed Linux in 5-years, which means, I’m unable to give this a test run to see if something is really down. However, we’ll investigate the matter to see if folks are truly having problems, or if it is just an isolated incident happening but only to a few.

While you’re waiting for some answers, go ahead and download the Windows 10 media pack. It’s a free download, so no commitment. It should also be noted that Windows 10 Anniversary Update, resets pen settings. It means if you have a Surface Pro or any other system that uses pen, you’ll have to customize your settings all over again.

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  • I installed W10 and Linux Mint 18 using UEFI. I forsee no issues. I think those having trouble are still using a legacy BIOS with MBR partitions. I use UEFI and GPT and backup my GPT tables.

  • I can say that I had bad experience with Windows 10. I had a setup of Windows 10 on the first partition and Linux using the remainder of the disk. So a dual-boot install. Everything was fine and I was always getting this GRUB boot menu where I could choose Linux or Windows. Until I did some system update on Windows 10. The computer could then only boot Windows 10, no more Linux. However, the problem was that Windows actually overwrote the boot piece of my hard disk, and did not erase the actual Linux partitions. Using a live distro, I could boot, and put back the GRUB functionality without damaging Windows nor Linux. This was more of an annoyance than anything else. But I will remain careful when updating Windows 10 on my hard disk. I guess this is worth a test on a VM as well.

  • Microsoft has ambitions similar to Monsanto and that wants to become something like a utility. They don’t want you to own your computer or that information. They believe it belongs to them and they want everyone rent space on their Cloud. This company will do everything to achieve this end including making sure that you cannot ever switch to Linux. To believe anything else is to be putting your head in the sand.

  • Do you get a choice in this update or is it like most Microsoft stupid ideas and just happens while you sleep. No big deal for me. I don’t keep anything important on my linux install or on Microsoft servers. All backed up nicely, but it would be interesting to know.

    • If you were paying attention, you could remove all the ‘update’ files which included those Trojan Horses that would kick Windows 10 into an auto-load, and haven’t run an update in years. Zero-problems

      I run a partition system, but follow Mr. Gate’s treason and blind-obedience to Big Brother, so knew well in advance of the danger.