Windows 10 version history


Robert Neagoe
by Robert Neagoe
Content Analyst
Loading Comments
Affiliate Disclosure

Windows 10 version history

Windows is an operating system created by Microsoft and it can be used mainly for PCs.

But this is just a very general definition, things are a bit more complicated with Windows 10, compared to previous operating systems, such as Windows 7 and Windows 8.1. Let’s look at the list of Windows 10 versions released so far and then understand the concept behind.

Windows 10 versions: a brief history

Version numberNameRelease DateEnd of support [Home * Pro]End of support [Enterprise * Education]
1903May 2019 UpdateMay 21, 2019December 8, 2020
1809 October 2018 UpdateNovember 13, 2018May 12, 2020May 11, 2021
1803April 2018 UpdateApril 30, 2018November 12, 2019November 10, 2020
1709Fall Creators UpdateOctober 17, 2017April 9, 2019April 14, 2020
1703Creators UpdateApril 5, 2017October 9, 2018October 8, 2019
1607Anniversary UpdateAugust 2, 2016April 10, 2018 October 13, 2026
1511Threshold 2November 10, 2015October 10, 2017October 10, 2017
1507Threshold 1July 29, 2015May 9, 2017May 9, 2017

What is Windows 10 as a service?

Microsoft decided to completely change their approach. Now, Windows is not simply an operating system, but a service. This way, the American tech giant simplified the lives of Windows users by offering smaller and periodical updates, rather than big changes that will bring an entirely new version of Windows with a distinct name.

So, now, instead of changing for example from Windows Vista to Windows 7, we may change from Windows 10 version 1809 to Windows 10 version 1903.

The differences between the last two are smaller than the differences between Windows Vista and Windows 7, but they should not be taken without any consideration. You run an entirely new version of the operating system, although it continues to be under the umbrella term “Windows 10”.

Therefore, starting with Windows 10, instead of waiting a few years to provide an entirely new version, Microsoft offers smaller incremental updates once every six months.

To have a clearer image of how this new concept of Windows works check out the table above with the entire update history for all the versions of Windows 10. This starts with Windows 10 version 1507 (released in the summer of 2015) and updates twice a year with a new version released by Microsoft Windows: 1511, 1607, 1703, 1709, 1803, 1809, 1903.

Will Microsoft end the support for older Windows 10 versions?

Well, of course. Each version has a “lifecycle” and it is supported by Microsoft for an 18 month period after the release date. It is worth mentioning that this period is available for Windows 10 Home, Pro, and Pro for Workstations editions.

The date for the end of support is different for Windows 10 Enterprise and Education editions.

Also, with Windows 10, there are two release types: feature updates, that are released twice a year, and quality updates (builds) that offer security and reliability fixes at least once a month.

For a better understanding of Windows 10 versions lifecycle, check out this timeline with the availability of each version release.

How do I get a new version of Windows 10?

For this new approach, Windows 10 can be provided via three servicing channels. This concept allows users to have greater control over which feature updates and quality updates are installed in Windows 10.

These channels are Windows Insider Program, Semi-Annual Channel and Long Term Servicing Channel.

Windows Insider Program offers the opportunity to test and provide feedback on various features. With Semi-Annual Channel, users can choose when to deploy updates. Long Term Servicing Channel is designed for specialized devices, such as medical equipment or ATM machines.