Fix: Be careful with this message on Gmail [Quick Guide]

Ivan Jenic
by Ivan Jenic
Troubleshooting Expert
Loading Comments
Download PDF
Affiliate Disclosure

  • A Be careful with this message... warning in your Gmail account should be taken very seriously.
  • We're talking here about the steps that you should follow should you get this message.
  • To be prepared for anything Gmail-related, visit our dedicated Gmail section.
  • For even more useful material, also see the full Email Hub.
Be careful with this message gmail

Some Windows users reported seeing the warning message Be careful with this message. It contains content that’s typically used to steal personal information in their Gmail account. If you want to know what this warning is about and how to fix it, read on.

Gmail is one of the most widely used webmail, globally. In order to access several Google products such as Google Drive, YouTube, Google Docs, and several Google Apps, an active Gmail account is required.

Meanwhile, Google is highly apprehensive when it comes to Gmail’s privacy and security; hence, Google implements extreme security measures to prevent malware and DDoS attacks which may arise from the cybersphere.

In addition, Google consistently notifies Gmail account owners whenever there is a login attempt from a strange location.

This is why, after accessing their emails and see the warning message mentioned above, some users got worried. There are several reasons for this warning message which include:

  • The email is sent from a fake email account
  • The email may contain malware and may redirect you to spammy sites
  • The spam filter may confuse the bulk mail with spam
  • Error from Google filters assuming the mail is from unverified sources
  • The email is sent from a compromised email account.

How to remove Gmail’s Be careful with this message warning

1. Check the IP addresscheck ip address

The first step to take after receiving the warning message Be careful with this message. It contains content that’s typically used to steal personal information is to check the sender’s IP address to make sure it is from a reliable source.

Some emails are used to either scam or steal users’ information after they click on unknown links which lead to scam webpages. Hence, you need to verify the origin of the domain/IP of the server.

Some online web applications such as Mxtoolbox, IPLocation and WhatIsMyIPAddress, etc can be used to check if the IP address of the sender is probably on the banned list for sending spammy messages.


2. Report phishing attemptreport phishing attempt

  1. In Gmail, open the suspicious message.
  2. Now, click on the down arrow next to Reply.
  3. Then, Reply drop-down arrow.
  4. Select Report Phishing. Google will look forward to further actions to be taken.

Sometimes, Google Mail may not be able to verify the real sender of the mail giving you the warning message. Emails from genuine webmail platforms do not come with the mentioned warning message.

However, emails from fake domains, do come with this warning message. Hence, the appropriate thing to do is to report such email sources to Google. This will prevent the sender from sending spammy emails to your email in the future.

Alternatively, you may carry out a whois check on the domain of the email host. Sites such as whois lookup, whois.com, etc can be used to find out more information about the sender.

Meanwhile, if you trust the message isn’t a scam, click on Ignore, I trust this message.


3. Use Malwarebytes to scan download files

be careful with this messageSome Windows users ignore the warning message and they click on available links in the email which contains malware.

Meanwhile, the ideal step afterward is to use remove the malware from your Windows PC by using MalwarebytesAdwCleaner.

This free tool will scan and remove PUPs from your computer. Here’s how to download, install, and use MalwarebytesAdwCleaner on your Windows PC:

  1. Download MalwarebytesAdwCleaner from the official website.
  2. After installation, right-click on the MalwarebytesAdwCleaner icon and then select Run as administrator to open the program.
  3. In the MalwarebytesAdwCleaner display, click on the Scan button to start the scanning operation.
  4. After the completed scan, click on the Clean button.
  5. Now, click OK when prompted to reboot your PC to complete cleaning.

4. Run a full system scan

After removing the suspected malware from your Windows PC, we do recommend that you carry out a full system scan to make sure that your computer is malware and virus free.

On the same note as before, we recommend that you use one of Malwarebyte’s antivirus options to perform this action.

Alternatively, you can also use Windows’ built-in antivirus, Windows Defender. Here’s how to run a full system scan using Windows Defender:

  1. Go to Start, type defender and double click on Windows Security to launch the tool.
  2. Go to Virus and Threat Protection
  3. In the new window, click on Scan options.run windows defender advanced scan
  4. Check the full scan option to launch a full system malware scan.

To conclude with, the Be careful with this message. It contains content that’s typically used to steal personal information warning message should not be taken lightly.

Hence, the steps mentioned above should be taken as a precaution against obtrusive threats that may appear from opening questionable emails.

Have you received this warning message on Gmail? Share your experience with other Windows users on this platform by commenting below.


FAQ: Learn more about warning messages in Gmail

  • How do I tell Gmail something is not spam?

One way of avoiding safe messages to go to spam in Gmail is to create a Safe Senders List.

  • What does it mean when a message is blocked on Gmail?

Sometimes, messages get blocked in Gmail for security reasons. But there’s a reason for that and also simple solutions to get around this situation.

  • Why are my emails being deleted automatically Gmail?

To stop Gmail messages being sent to Trash, you need to check a few options in your email account.

Editor’s Note: This post was originally published in June 2018, and was updated and revamped in July 2020 for freshness and accuracy.